Blood test research into predicting your chances of having another heart attack.

Article written by Liam Mannix in the Sydney Morning Herald outlines exciting new work exploring changes in our blood and what they can indicate. I know that once someone has had a heart attack the fear of having another can limit how they let themselves experience life.  So great news from this team of Melbourne based researchers.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/blood-test-to-better-predict-heart-attacks-being-developed-in-melbourne-20180906-p5022y.html?btis

Blood on Silk Buy Sell 02

Image of detail of Blood on Silk: Buy/Sell 2017

 

Advertisements

Still in Trial but looking good – an optic device that creates a 3D hologram from a blood sample to rate a patient’s probability of forming a life threatening blood clot.

From an article ‘How a beer at a uni bar sparked an idea that could save millions’ by Blake Foden in the Sydney Morning Herald.   Click on beer to get the link to the SMH Site to read the full article blood clot .JPG

The rise and rise of algorithms in the treatment of patients.

https://qz.com/1189730/google-is-using-46-billion-data-points-to-predict-the-medical- outcomes-of-hospital-patients/

The title of the article on the quartz website is  Google is using 46 billion data points to predict the medical outcomes of hospital patients’.   This includes the claim by Google that they have …. ‘the ability to predict patient deaths 24-48 hours before current methods… ‘

The research paper from Google apparently hasn’t been peer reviewed yet and it will be very interesting to see how this all plays out.

 

Four new subtypes of white blood cells discovered.

https://wellcome.ac.uk/news/new-types-blood-cells-discovered

dendritic-cell-1200x1200

Credit: NIH/Wikimedia Commons
A magnified dendritic cell.

Funded by the Wellcome Trust, researchers from the Broad Institute spanning MIT and Harvard, have discovered four new subtypes of white blood cells using single cell genomics. The image above, from the Wellcome announcement is of a beautiful almost fungal shape, an expression of the body’s defence system.

This work is part of an ongoing project to map every cell type in the body.

 

Battery powered means of detecting malaria in the bloodstream while the blood is still within the body.

What a fantastic way of making the cost of testing so cheap and so flexible in terms of conditions of use that its really, really useful.

https://www.monash.edu/news/articles/scientists-a-step-closer-to-fighting-malaria-with-world-first-diagnostic-tool  

Bayden-Wood-and-Members-of-No-Roads-Expedition-web

Associate Professor Bayden Wood and members of the No Road Expeditions group.

Photo credit: Steve Morton

 

Images courtesy of the Monash website