Video of new work Blood on Silk: Buy/Sell up on vimeo

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10 images of Blood on Silk: Bleeding Out finally all up online.

Click on the link below or otherwise look up Fiona Davies then Selected work then Blood on Silk Bleeding Out.   The first two images show you what the work looks like in full light without the projection. I’ve done this to give you an idea of how it works physically in space. Then the overhead lights are turned off, the interior lights go on, the projection goes on and then the audience is added.

http://www.fionadavies.com.au/default4.asp

A table top set up with viewing positions like a peep show allows the viewer to look down into a surreal landscape of homogenised real and play or pretend medicalised equipment, as it is washed by the projections of a slow bleeding out. The world within the surreal landscape is controlled and contained where its boundaries operate like a semi permeable membrane with some things held and others allowed to pass. When the viewer bends to look into the peep holes/microscope lenses set into the bottom of everyday glass kitchen and tableware the projections then show on the back of their heads co-opting them into the landscape but not necessarily requiring their informed consent. Blood on Silk Bleeding Out_Fiona Davies (11)

 

 

Blood is fantastic – no doubt about it.

A recent online article in Science News https://www.sciencenews.org/blog/science-ticker/red-blood-cells-sense-low-oxygen-brain,  just expands on the fascinating details known about blood and its behaviour.
The article entitled ‘ Red blood cells sense low oxygen in the brain’ is by Laura Sanders published on  August 4, 2016. the first paragraph states that ‘ When the brain runs low on oxygen, red blood cells sense the deficit and hurl themselves through capillaries to deliver their cargo. That reaction, described online August 4 in Neuron, suggests that red blood cells can both detect and remedy low oxygen’

high )2 Capture

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Transcultural Exchange 2016

TransCultural_Exchange_logoI’ve just come back from Boston where I attended the Transcultural Exchange 2016, an international conference on opportunities in the arts. As part of the programme I chaired a roundtable discussion about artists working with medicine. Much to my surprise a reasonably sized crowd of about forty people participated and I was really excited by the generosity and willingness to encourage everyone to share their voice and experiences. It was a great way to start the conference and also meant that as a relative unknown I met and got to know a large number of the conference participants through this process. All in all something I can totally recommend

Haemoglobin colour scale used by the WHO since 1995

Hb colour scale

from the ‘A simple and reliable method for estimating
haemoglobin by G.J. Stott1 & S.M. Lewis2
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 1995, 73 (3): 369-373’

Starting point for a series of new works using the colour scales of the colour of blood differentiated by a range of properties.

Great quote from Nicola Triscott/Arts Catalyst writng on the arts/science interface

‘Many people ask me what scientists “get” from work with artists. I feel James Wells, the theoretical physicist who was the ‘inspirational partner’ for Collide@CERN’s first artist in residence Julius von Bismarck expressed it so beautifully when he talked about valuing having someone around who saw the world in a different way, whose influence, he felt, could shake up accepted mindsets. In a talk, Wells notes that the process of becoming a scientist can “snuff out the daring impulse” in young scientists and that it is the “tremendous daring and openness of ideas” of artists that might really benefit the scientific community. “The first thought of an artist is not can we do this, but ‘this is what I want to do’” he remarked.’

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Physicist James Wells with Julius von Bismarck, the first Collide@Cern Artist in Residence

Click on the picture to link to the full blog post by Nicola