The long version of the card game Racing Patience ICU is now online

https://vimeo.com/285956777

Racing Patience ICU can be a tough game. There’s no taking turns and it can be physical and fast. This video starts by explaining the rules and finishes with a call for the video referee.

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New Work – Blood on Silk: Blood Running

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Video still from a new work Blood on Silk: Blood Running, 2018. The video will be projected onto the surface of a wondercabinet zinc box set on the top of a table. Part of the video of the running blood will occasionally extend onto the floor.

Racing Patience ICU – video

https://vimeo.com/257997930Install shot - Fiona Davies Racing Patience ICU, 2018 phot credit Alex Gooding .JPG

In the card game Racing Patience ICU there are two players. One draws a central card that describes the patient’s stats when entering ICU. Starting at the same time, one player represents the ICU team trying to bring the patient back into the normal or survivable ranges for blood pressure, heart rate, blood oxygenation and rate of respiration. The other player sometimes called Death, attempts to take the patient out of those survivable ranges. Each player attempts to track the four parameters, keeping a rough tally in their head of the changes in the patient stats as each card is added to one of the four stacks. The players turn over their cards in groups of three, being able to play the top card only. It is not a social or fair game. It is extremely competitive and can be rough and physical as each player tries to get their card onto the stacks in the centre. Importantly there is no concept of taking turns. It requires an ability to focus on many things which are changing, all at the same time. At the end of five minutes an alarm sounds. The game is over. On a count-back the winner is decided. The winner is who determined whether the patient during that particular five minutes was in or out of the survivable range for the four vital signs. Who knows what happened in the next five minutes and if the ethics of particular interventions that drove the often widely swinging changes of the parameters were ever able to be considered.

Documentation of the card game ‘Racing Patience ICU’

A short video, four minutes in length, documenting some of the first games played of Racing Patience ICU.  The artist Fiona Davies plays against the performance artist Tom Isaacs and the curator Lizzy Marshall.

In the card game Racing Patience ICU there are two players. One draws a central card that describes the patient’s stats when entering ICU. Starting at the same time, one player represents the ICU team trying to bring the patient back into the normal or survivable ranges for blood pressure, heart rate, blood oxygenation and rate of respiration. The other player sometimes called Death, attempts to take the patient out of those survivable ranges. Each player attempts to track the four parameters, keeping a rough tally in their head of the changes in the patient stats as each card is added to one of the four stacks. The players turn over their cards in groups of three, being able to play the top card only.

It is not a social or fair game. It is extremely competitive and can be rough and physical as each player tries to get their card onto the stacks in the centre. Importantly there is no concept of taking turns. It requires an ability to focus on many things which are changing, all at the same time.

At the end of five minutes an alarm sounds. The game is over. On a count-back the winner is decided. The winner is who determined whether the patient during that particular five minutes was in or out of the survivable range for the four vital signs. Who knows what happened in the next five minutes and if the ethics of particular interventions that drove the often widely swinging changes of the parameters were ever able to be considered.