It turns out that the term fairy tale was first thought of by a woman around 1690.

The French writer Marie-Catherine d’Aulnoy questioned the status quo and in particular the patriarchy by using the form of the fairy tale to both subtly and directly question the accepted male and female behaviors of the time. The link below is to an article from Late Night Live on the ABC discussing the fictionalised reinterpretation of d’Áulnoy ‘s life by the writer Melissa Ashley.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-11-07/fairytale-author-marie-catherine-daulnoy-wrote-a-rebellion/11627040

There is renewed focus on the form of the fairy tale as a way of saying something to part of the audience but not necessarily to all the audience. By using a simple sentence structure and language these tales can appear to be easy to understand however they can also be seen to be incredibly complicated.

On Thursday 28th Nov from 5.45 I am screening three very short videos of fairy-tales at the Golden Age Cinema in Sydney Australia. Tickets are free and you can register on this web site https://www.eventbrite.com/e/once-upon-a-time-long-ago-and-far-away-x-3-tickets-81856449845

Video of Stage One in the Performative Lecture ‘ Cast a Cold Eye on Life, on Death is online.

From May 10th to 18th, 2019.the artist, Fiona Davies, undertook a series of performative lectures within the exhibition Cast a Cold Eye on Life on Death: The Remake Medicalised Death in ICU. This is Davies’s examination exhibition, the culmination of four years of practice-led research into medicalised death in ICU. There are a series of installations, object-based works, performances and interactive works. In each performative lecture Davies led a small group of viewers through these works, involved them in activities and if they wanted to. encouraged them to participate in conversations about medicalised death.From May 10th to 18th, 2019.the artist, Fiona Davies, undertook a series of performative lectures within the exhibition Cast a Cold Eye on Life on Death: The Remake Medicalised Death in ICU. This is Davies’s examination exhibition, the culmination of four years of practice-led research into medicalised death in ICU. There are a series of installations, object-based works, performances and interactive works. In each performative lecture Davies led a small group of viewers through these works, involved them in activities and if they wanted to. encouraged them to participate in conversations about medicalised death.

This video is of the first stage in the lecture. It starts with an oral history given by an ICU nurses about one patient and her death. This oral history is quoted from ‘David Crippen, End-of-Life Communication in the ICU: A Global Perspective (New York: Springer, 2008): 52.’ Then Davies sits behind the audience to tell a fairy tale while they watch the simulation on the medical monitor of a patient rupturing an abdominal aneurysm and bleeding out to death.

Warning: The exhibition and the performative lecture contain images, sounds and activities that deal with death, dying, hospitals, violence, blood and body parts for transplantation.

‘Cast a Cold eye on Life, on Death’ is a quote by WB Yeats